Guth nan Gàidheal

An Comunn Gàidhealach Ameireaganach (The American Scottish Gaelic Society, or  ACGA), in association with Hard To Port Internet Radio in Baltimore, is thrilled to announce our latest project, by our members for our members.

Rèidio Guth nan Gàidheal (“Voice of the Gael” Radio, or “GnG”) is a block of Scottish Gaelic and English Internet Radio programming, focusing on the Scottish Gaelic language in North America, and the culture associated with it.

The broadcast will run initially once a week during a Tuesday evening (US/Eastern time) with an encore presentation in the early hours of the following day for listeners in Europe. Other encore presentations may follow.

The inaugural programs for our launch are in the final stages of preparation, and Guth nan Gàidheal will launch in early 2015.

Guth nan Gàidheal was conceived as a volunteer-led project, with ACGA members and other individuals from outside the organization who are interested in Gaelic, making programs for all to enjoy. We plan to encourage and assist ACGA members (and others outwith the organization) who want to produce their own Gaelic-themed programs and features for broadcast on Guth nan Gàidheal.

“What we would dearly like is for this to become a community effort, and that’s why opening up the chance to produce programming to the membership as well as our friends in Nova Scotia and Scotland is so important. We would like everyone to feel that they have something to contribute” says Guth nan Gàidheal Executive Producer and ACGA Vice President, Steaphanaidh Carlyle.

“What better way to engage non fluent learners than letting them see that other non fluent people can have a chance to produce their own radio show, or be involved in producing one! We want to cater for everyone, from the beginner learner to the native speaker. We want to be able to reach into the Gaelic community in North America and at the same time, show everyone its richness. We want to be accessible to that same community so that people of all levels of Gaelic comprehension can find something worthwhile to listen to on Guth nan Gàidheal, and feel that they have the ability to contribute.”

Please visit our website at http://gng.acgamerica.org/ for the latest news about our launch date, our programming, and for broadcast schedules.

You can also like our Facebook page at http://facebook.com/GuthNanGaidheal, and follow our Twitter feed at @GuthNanGaidheal.

A’ cumail na Gàidhlig Beò – Keeping Gaelic Alive!

An Naidheachd Againne, Winter 2014 Issue Is Available

The Winter, 2014, issue of our newsletter, An Naidheachd Againne, has been released.

An Naidheachd Againne, Winter 2014Members should have received it, but they can also obtain it online, by logging in to the  ACGA Forum, and checking the Members Room.

Non-members can obtain issues through Summer 2014 in the Public Room of the forum, which requires no login, though you’re welcome to create an account and join our discussions whether you’re a member or not.

Information about joining ACGA can be found here.

Gàidhlig on the Go. uTalk ( from ANA Winter 2012)

In our fifth reprint from our Quarterly members e-zine “An Naidheachd Againne”, Rudy Ramsey reviewed u-Talk Scottish Gaelic — a learning aid for iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch.

uTalk Scottish Gaelic is another iPhone app that’s worth a look. This is a vocabulary practice app, but it’s more motivating than the usual flash-card approach.uTalk starts with a Word Practice mode, in which it presents a series of words or phrases with both the Gaelic and the English in writing, a picture of the object or situation, and an audio of the spoken Gaelic…

To read more, please click the link below (PDF Format – Adobe Reader Required). The article also contains a link to a thread about the article in the ACGA Forum, to allow discussion or questions.

http://download.acgamerica.org/Reprints/ANA_Reprint_5_GotG_2012-4.pdf

The Kirkin’ o’ the Tartans

The “Kirkin’ o’ the Tartans” is a ceremony, usually but not always part of a church service, in which God’s blessing is sought for the tartans worn by the Scots. This “tradition” appears to have begun in World War II as a Scottish-American event, though it has now spread to many parts of the Scots’ world. The history is interesting, and there are at least some tenuous connections to practices among the highlanders after the Jacobite Rebellion of 1745.

Though these ceremonies were originally found only in Presbyterian churches, they’ve spread to other denominations, and are even sometimes found at Highland games. They can be performed at any time of the year, but are especially common on Reformation Sunday (last Sunday in October), St. Andrew’s Day (November 30), and Tartan Day (April 6).

From time to time, we receive requests for a Scots Gaelic blessing for use at a Kirkin’ o’ the Tartans service. This is a very natural request, but because this isn’t an ancient tradition, there’s no old Gaelic prayer or blessing available for the purpose.

Catriona Parsons

We asked Catrìona Parsons, who is a native speaker, one of the world’s best-known teachers of Gaelic, and a friend of ACGA, if such a blessing existed. Her response was to write one for us. 🙂 It’s short enough to be feasible for non-Gaelic-speakers. We think it’s lovely, and it should work quite well wherever folks want to do the blessing in Gaelic.

Here’s the blessing in Gaelic.

A Dhè, beannaich na Gàidheil agus na
h-Albannaich bho ’n d’thàinig sinn;
Beannaich sinne, ’s na breacain a tha
sinn fhathast a’ cur oirnn;
Agus beannaich an dualchas a tha sinn
a’ cumail suas.
AMEN.

Here’s a translation to English

O God, bless the Gaels and the Scots from
whom we are descended;
Bless us, and the tartans we still wear;
And bless the heritage that we uphold.
AMEN.

Here’s a link to an audio file that can be used in the actual service, or used to learn to speak the blessing.

Here’s a rough pronunciation guide intended for English speakers who don’t know Gaelic. Be aware that such guides often produce terrible results when used as the sole learning aid, but if you look at this while listening to the audio, you’ll likely be able to distinguish sounds that would otherwise be elusive.

Uh yay, byaunich na gale uh gus na halapanich vown d’ hanug sheen;
Byaunich sheen ya, sna brechkun uh ha sheen hahst uh coor orn;
Uh gus byaunich uhn duelchus uh ha sheen uh koomuhl soo us.
Ah men.

Be aware that: the “ch” is as in “Ich” in German.
“byau” rhymes with “meow”.
“gale”: like English “gale”. Definitely no “y” sound, though, as “gyale”.
“vown”: say “own” with a “v” in front.
“d’”: say “duh”, but shorten it to just the “d” sound.
“hahst” Say “hah”, but stretch the “ah”, then add “st”.

If you actually use this blessing in a Kirkin’, please let us know. 🙂

 

Cha Bu Mhiste Sinn Leabhar Na Trì (ANA Winter 2013)

In our fourth reprint, Cam MacRae talks about Graphic Novels.

A bheil sibh measail air nobhailean grafaigeach? Nuair a thòisich leabhraichean grafaigeach a’ nochdadh air sgeilpichean an leabharlainn anns an robh mi ag obair mu dheich bliadhna air ais, cha robh ùidh agam annta idir. Uill, bha mi air Maus a leughadh, gu cinnteach, ach bha an còrr airson na cloinne, nach robh? O, bha gu dearbh, ach feumaidh mi aideachadh gun do leugh mi Asterix the Gaul, cuideachd.
Abair dòigh eachdraidh ionnsachadh! …

Are you a fan of graphic novels? When graphic books began to appear on the shelves of the library where I worked about ten years ago, I wasn’t too interested in them. Well, I had read Maus of course, but the others were for children, weren’t they? Sure, but I must admit that I read Asterix the Gaul too. What a way to learn history! …

To read more, please click the link below (PDF Format – Adobe Reader Required). The article also contains a link to a thread about the article in the ACGA Forum, to allow discussion or questions.

http://download.acgamerica.org/Reprints/ANA_Reprint_4_Cam_2013-1.pdf