Glasgow Gaelic School Keeps Growing

Critics of Gaelic-medium education often decry it as serving “the middle class,” but the headteacher of Glasgow Gaelic School/Sgoil Ghàidhlig Ghlaschu says that’s not true.

In a recent article in Scotland’s The Herald newspaper, Donalda McComb, said 15 percent of the Gaelic-medium school’s pupils come from neighborhoods classed as the poorest in Scotland, though 17 percent come from wealthy neighborhoods.

“Some 19 per cent of our school population are eligible for free school meals and every year that is increasing,” McComb told The Herald. “By now we should be over the perception of Gaelic as for middle class families. … “We encourage all families from the local area and beyond so that parents know what is ahead and it is unfair if people still see us like that.”

The school, which had 33 pupils when it was established in 2006, now has 343 students.

Young Scot group promotes Gaelic

Young Scot launches a national campaign last month to interest young people in Scottish Gaelic.
Young Scot launched its Gaelic campaign in Edinburgh last month.

Youth organization and charity Young Scot wants to interest more young people in learning and using Scottish Gaelic. The group launched a national campaign last month that will provide a variety of services, resources and information online in Gaelic on topics from managing money to puberty.

“We know developing language skills is a great way to strengthen career prospects available to Scotland’s young people,” Ruairidh Hamilton, Gaelic Development Officer at Young Scott, said in a statement.

“This project is a really exciting way for Young Scot to give Gaelic speakers the resources that they need and to showcase the benefits of adopting the Gaelic language in everyday life,” he said. “We want young people to have easy access to advice and support that can help them achieve their future ambitions.”

The group, which has 675,000 members aged 11 to 26 in Scotland, has published information in Gaelic on several topics on its website, including a “Simple Guide to Learning Gaelic” and a section on “Cothroman Gàidhlig: Gàidhlig Opportunities.” It also offers discounts on books and travel and rewards for completing activities, such as writing a biography in Gaelic.

There’s growing demand for opportunities to learn and use Gaelic among young Scots, said the organization. Young Scot also wants to encourage members to pursue career opportunities through Gaelic.  A 2014 survey estimated the Gaelic language is worth almost £150 million to the Scottish economy and offers career prospects in industries ranging from tourism to education.

The national campaign was launched at the Young Scot head office in Edinburgh, where first-time speakers and young Gaelic enthusiasts took part in an interactive Q&A with a panel that included representatives from the Scottish Parliament. The event highlighted the benefits of young people learning the historic and culturally rich language in the modern world.

Visit the Gaelic campaign at https://young.scot/gaelic

Follow Young Scot on Twitter at @YoungScot

— Liam Ó Caiside

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ACGA is looking for correspondents interested in contributing short news items about Scottish Gaelic events and activities. Would you like to contribute?  Send an email to Liam.

Cuach na Cloinne – Football Brings Gaelic Kids Together

Highland Council Convenor Bill Lobban and the winning team Bun-sgoil Taobh na Pàirce, Dùn Èideann (Parkside Gaelic School, Edinburgh).
Highland Council Convenor Bill Lobban and the winning team Bun-sgoil Taobh na Pàirce, Dùn Èideann (Parkside Gaelic School, Edinburgh).

A national football (soccer) competition in Scotland is bringing Gaelic-speaking and Gaelic-learning children from across the country together, helping them to make new friends and demonstrating that Gaelic is spoken beyond their local communities.

The Cuach na Cloinne (Children’s Quaich or Cup) competition is held entirely in Scottish Gaelic.  This year, a record 62 teams participated in the, representing 33 schools. Regional competitions were held over several weeks in the Highlands, Hebrides and Glasgow.

Edinburgh’s Bun-sgoil Taobh na Pàirce came out on top this year, emerging victorious from a match against runners-up Bun-sgoil Ghàidhlig Inbhir Nis (Inverness) May 30. The game was played at Inverness’s Caledonian Thistle F C Stadium.

“Many congratulations go to Bun-sgoil Taobh na Pàirce,”  Highland Council Convenor Councillor Bill Lobban said in a statement (available in English / Gàidhlig).

Cuach na Cloinne 2017 was funded by Comhairle na Gàidhealtachd and Comhairle nan Eilean Siar (The Highland Council and Western Isles Council) along with Bòrd na Gàidhlig and organized by Comunn na Gàidhlig.

Cuach na Cloinne “has created an opportunity for young people from schools across Scotland who attend Gaelic Medium Education to meet and compete against each other and combines their Gaelic linguistic and footballing skills,” Lobban said.

“It is particularly pleasing to hear the youngsters taking part in the competition communicating so naturally with each other in Gaelic,” David Boag, director of language planning and community developments at Bòrd na Gàidhlig, said in the statement.

This year, Bòrd na Gàidhlig sponsored a new trophy, Sàr Neach Cleachdaidh na Gàidhlig, presented to the individual player who, in the view of the referees, made the most use of the Gaelic language throughout the event.

The winner of the award was Murdo Shaw, from Bun-sgoil Ghàidhlig Loch Abair (Lochaber).

Nach math a rinn iad uile?

 

 

Faochadh Èibhinn – Comic Relief!

‘S e an Dòmhnach (neo Latha na Sàbaid) a th’ann. DiLuain a-màireach. Dh’fhaodadh gu bheil feum agaibh air faochadh. Seo dhuibh “an aon chomaig Gàidhlig air loidhne air an t-saoghal” – ‘S Math Sin!

The only Gaelic comic online in the world!
The only Gaelic comic online in the world!

Agus tha sinn an dòchas gum bi an seachdain a thig math dhuibh.

It’s Sunday. Tomorrow is Monday. It’s possible you may need some relief. Here’s “the Only Gaelic Comic Online in the World!” – ‘S Math Sin! (“That’s Good!” or “Smashing!”)

Click on the image above to access the comics from Stòrlann Naiseanta na Gàidhlig, created for children but enjoyable for Gaelic learners of any age, especially beginners.

Added Value: The comic comes with audio files so you can listen to the dialogue.

We hope the coming week is good to you!