Guth nan Gàidheal

An Comunn Gàidhealach Ameireaganach (The American Scottish Gaelic Society, or  ACGA), in association with Hard To Port Internet Radio in Baltimore, is thrilled to announce our latest project, by our members for our members.

Rèidio Guth nan Gàidheal (“Voice of the Gael” Radio, or “GnG”) is a block of Scottish Gaelic and English Internet Radio programming, focusing on the Scottish Gaelic language in North America, and the culture associated with it.

The broadcast will run initially once a week during a Tuesday evening (US/Eastern time) with an encore presentation in the early hours of the following day for listeners in Europe. Other encore presentations may follow.

The inaugural programs for our launch are in the final stages of preparation, and Guth nan Gàidheal will launch in early 2015.

Guth nan Gàidheal was conceived as a volunteer-led project, with ACGA members and other individuals from outside the organization who are interested in Gaelic, making programs for all to enjoy. We plan to encourage and assist ACGA members (and others outwith the organization) who want to produce their own Gaelic-themed programs and features for broadcast on Guth nan Gàidheal.

“What we would dearly like is for this to become a community effort, and that’s why opening up the chance to produce programming to the membership as well as our friends in Nova Scotia and Scotland is so important. We would like everyone to feel that they have something to contribute” says Guth nan Gàidheal Executive Producer and ACGA Vice President, Steaphanaidh Carlyle.

“What better way to engage non fluent learners than letting them see that other non fluent people can have a chance to produce their own radio show, or be involved in producing one! We want to cater for everyone, from the beginner learner to the native speaker. We want to be able to reach into the Gaelic community in North America and at the same time, show everyone its richness. We want to be accessible to that same community so that people of all levels of Gaelic comprehension can find something worthwhile to listen to on Guth nan Gàidheal, and feel that they have the ability to contribute.”

Please visit our website at http://gng.acgamerica.org/ for the latest news about our launch date, our programming, and for broadcast schedules.

You can also like our Facebook page at http://facebook.com/GuthNanGaidheal, and follow our Twitter feed at @GuthNanGaidheal.

A’ cumail na Gàidhlig Beò – Keeping Gaelic Alive!

Gàidhlig on the Go. uTalk ( from ANA Winter 2012)

In our fifth reprint from our Quarterly members e-zine “An Naidheachd Againne”, Rudy Ramsey reviewed u-Talk Scottish Gaelic — a learning aid for iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch.

uTalk Scottish Gaelic is another iPhone app that’s worth a look. This is a vocabulary practice app, but it’s more motivating than the usual flash-card approach.uTalk starts with a Word Practice mode, in which it presents a series of words or phrases with both the Gaelic and the English in writing, a picture of the object or situation, and an audio of the spoken Gaelic…

To read more, please click the link below (PDF Format – Adobe Reader Required). The article also contains a link to a thread about the article in the ACGA Forum, to allow discussion or questions.

http://download.acgamerica.org/Reprints/ANA_Reprint_5_GotG_2012-4.pdf

Gaelic Resource: A’ Choille

[Webmaster’s note: One of ACGA’s membership services is that, from time to time, we acquaint our members with interesting resources that might help them improve their Gaelic. We do this by e-mail. We haven’t posted such information on our website in the past, because we didn’t have a suitable website design. Now we do, so we’ll put a portion of them here for your delectation.]

Our thanks to Jeanne Pendergast for the following.

BBC has a new look to their home page, and in poking around I tried one of their offerings for children, “A’ Choille.”

http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/foghlam/achoille/

It’s childish, of course, but for learners at the right stage, hearing the stories read might be helpful.  You can try understanding as much as you can without looking at the words, and then the next time, if you click on the little “book” on the right, you can see the words as the story is read.

If you choose Sgeulachdan, there are 4 different little “morality” stories, Gaelic translation by Iseabail T. NicDhòmhnaill.

Among the “ubhlan,” you can choose “Leugh” (advancing the pages yourself when you are ready) or “Coimhead” with a continuous story.  Either way the narrator reads the story, and the characters’ voices, while sometimes artificial sounding, are much more understandable than the squeaky voices in some of the Gaelic cartoons I’ve seen that are aimed at unfortunate young children.

“A’ Choille” is aimed at ages 5-7, but there are three others for older children, including an interesting one for high school age containing diaries written at different times by a dozen youngsters who have had to emigrate for various reasons.  This one is based on real people and their stories.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/foghlam/imrich/diaries/