$100,000 endowment to benefit Gaelic teaching, education in Nova Scotia

A $100,000 endowment fund supporting Gaelic culture and teaching will be announced today in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

The Neil and Marianne Joy MacLean Estate Gift to Saint Francis Xavier University will promote and develop proficient Gaelic teachers and help advance Scottish Gaelic language and culture in Nova Scotia, the university announced on its Facebook page.

The estate gift will support Gaelic educators through the StFX Bachelor of Education program. The official announcement will be made during the milling frolic at the Art Gallery in Halifax.

Classroom at St. Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, Nova Scotia. Gaelic has been taught at StFX since 1890.
Classroom at St. Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, Nova Scotia. Gaelic has been taught at StFX since 1890. Photo: StFX.

The MacLeans shared a great love for the Gaelic language and music, StFX said. Mr. MacLean especially loved Milling Frolics and concerts that involved his musically talented nieces, the “MacLean Sisters.”

In addition for their love of Celtic Music, travel and other cultures, the MacLeans shared an undying passion for scholarship and helping others learn, StFX said.

Their mutual love of Gaelic is now embodied in the spirit of giving and scholarships.

Cuach na Cloinne – Football Brings Gaelic Kids Together

Highland Council Convenor Bill Lobban and the winning team Bun-sgoil Taobh na Pàirce, Dùn Èideann (Parkside Gaelic School, Edinburgh).
Highland Council Convenor Bill Lobban and the winning team Bun-sgoil Taobh na Pàirce, Dùn Èideann (Parkside Gaelic School, Edinburgh).

A national football (soccer) competition in Scotland is bringing Gaelic-speaking and Gaelic-learning children from across the country together, helping them to make new friends and demonstrating that Gaelic is spoken beyond their local communities.

The Cuach na Cloinne (Children’s Quaich or Cup) competition is held entirely in Scottish Gaelic.  This year, a record 62 teams participated in the, representing 33 schools. Regional competitions were held over several weeks in the Highlands, Hebrides and Glasgow.

Edinburgh’s Bun-sgoil Taobh na Pàirce came out on top this year, emerging victorious from a match against runners-up Bun-sgoil Ghàidhlig Inbhir Nis (Inverness) May 30. The game was played at Inverness’s Caledonian Thistle F C Stadium.

“Many congratulations go to Bun-sgoil Taobh na Pàirce,”  Highland Council Convenor Councillor Bill Lobban said in a statement (available in English / Gàidhlig).

Cuach na Cloinne 2017 was funded by Comhairle na Gàidhealtachd and Comhairle nan Eilean Siar (The Highland Council and Western Isles Council) along with Bòrd na Gàidhlig and organized by Comunn na Gàidhlig.

Cuach na Cloinne “has created an opportunity for young people from schools across Scotland who attend Gaelic Medium Education to meet and compete against each other and combines their Gaelic linguistic and footballing skills,” Lobban said.

“It is particularly pleasing to hear the youngsters taking part in the competition communicating so naturally with each other in Gaelic,” David Boag, director of language planning and community developments at Bòrd na Gàidhlig, said in the statement.

This year, Bòrd na Gàidhlig sponsored a new trophy, Sàr Neach Cleachdaidh na Gàidhlig, presented to the individual player who, in the view of the referees, made the most use of the Gaelic language throughout the event.

The winner of the award was Murdo Shaw, from Bun-sgoil Ghàidhlig Loch Abair (Lochaber).

Nach math a rinn iad uile?

 

 

Where’s Your Gaelic-Learning Community?

Where can we find Gaelic-learning communities? Help us map them.
Where can we find Gaelic-learning communities? Help us map them.

In recent months, ACGA has been taking a closer look at what we’re calling “Gaelic-Learning Communities.” There may not be many Gaelic-speaking communities in North America, outside Eastern Canada, but Gaelic-learning communities may be found everywhere. Do you belong to one of these communities?

It’s good to first recognize what they are. To date, “Gaelic-learning community” has principally been used to refer to Gaelic learners as a whole, i.e. “the Gaelic-learning community of Scotland,” the overall number of people learning Gaelic in Scotland.

We’ve got a new definition:

  1. A community of Scottish Gaelic learners living in a particular place or region, such as New York, Toronto, Seattle or Dallas.
  2. An online or virtual community of Gaelic learners, connected via the Internet.

A Gaelic-learning community is not an official class, though it may include a study group and formal classes. It may be focused on other activities involving the language, from social evenings to group outings. It may consist of people living close to each other who take an online course and meet only occasionally. In short, the Gaelic-learning community is a network of people who want to learn Scottish Gaelic.

Gaelic learners need interaction with other learners and speakers. Many ACGA members have expressed a strong desire to join a “community” of Gaelic learners and speakers, both local, national and international. That’s often why they come to ACGA, seeking that a doorway to that community.

 There’s obviously a need to better connect local Gaelic Learning Communities and individuals throughout North America. ACGA’s Membership and Outreach Committee was tasked by the Board of Directors with surveying teachers and study groups known to ACGA as a first step in identifying Gaelic-Learning Communities or “GLCs” and determining how ACGA could assist them. The initial survey will soon be available on this website. We’ve already followed up with surveys sent to individual Gaelic learners.

Eventually, the survey results will help ACGA create and publish a new list of Gaelic-Learning Communities. The first step though, is identifying where those communities are. Some major metropolitan areas, naturally, have stronger GLCs – New York, Toronto, Seattle, Washington DC, Baltimore, Denver. But we’ve heard from people who want to start communities in Oklahoma City, rural North Carolina and the Southwest.

How can you help? You can help us “map” the Gaelic Learning Communities of North America. If you belong to such a group, or would like to form one, let us know. We will eventually change our Classes and Distance Learning page to a Gaelic Learning Communities page, with more information where to find a GLC, what they do, and how to start one, if you’ve got a couple of people and the required misneachd!

Write to ACGA Board Member Liam Cassidy with questions or information at willbcassidy@gmail.com.

 

 

Baltimore-DC area Gaelic Learning Groups plan June 5 Picnic

CarderockTwo East Coast Gaelic Learning Communities plan to meet up on Sunday, June 4, from 1-5 pm, for a picnic and Gaelic hike at Carderock Recreation Area just outside Washington, D.C.

Gàidhlig Photomac, a group of Gaelic learners in the DC-Northern Virginia-Southern Maryland area, will join with Sgoil Ghàidhlig Bhaile an Taigh Mhòir, the Baltimore Gaelic School, for càirdeas, ceòl, cluichean agus coiseachd (fun, music, games and walking).

The outing will start at 1 pm (try to get there a bit early), with a short class and a game, followed by the hike (which should be an easy one). We’ll learn appropriate Gaelic phrases and vocabulary on the way, and return for our picnic by about 3 pm.

This is the first joint event sponsored by the two groups, and a sign of growing interest in linking Gaelic Learning Communities throughout North America in social activities as well as language learning.

ACGA recently completed an initial survey on Gaelic Learning Communities and is looking for ways to actively support and encourage them and connect them.

For information on the picnic, visit Sgoil Ghàidhlig Bhaile an Taigh Mhòir’s Facebook page, or the Meetup page of Gàidhlig Photomac.

— Liam Ó Caiside

30th US Mòd to Feature First ACGA Fèis

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This year will be the 30th Anniversary of the U.S. National Mòd or Mòd Naiseanta Aimeireagaidh, an event born in Alexandria, Virginia in 1988, when An Comunn Gàidhealach Ameireaganach launched what was then called Mòd Virginia at the Virginia Scottish Games.

The event will take place over four days this year, from the evening of Thursday, Sept. 21 through Sunday, Sept. 24, at Ligonier, Pennsylvania.

We’ve grown from small beginnings, adding competitions over the years and expanding to cover Scottish Gaelic language arts such as poetry, storytelling and drama as well as song. And we’re still growing. This year we will be adding special competitions to mark our 30th anniversary. Most important, we’re adding an entire new event that broadens focus on Gaelic culture beyond language arts alone and competitions: the First ACGA Fèis.

What is a Fèis, and how is it different from a Mòd? Both feature Gaelic song and music. Both provide opportunities to develop skills in the Gaelic arts. But while mòdan or mòds feature competitions, fèisean do not. A fèis includes classes and workshops, rather than competitions. By adding a fèis to our Mòd, we can open doors to those who want to learn about Gaelic culture, learn to play a tune, or sing a song, without entering a competition.

In Scotland, the Fèis movement got its start in the 1980s. Today there are 47 local fèisean throughout Scotland, focused on local needs and providing infor- mal education.

The First Annual ACGA Fèis will be held all day Friday, Sept. 22, at the Antiochian Village in Ligonier, Pennsylvania, which has been home to the U.S. National Mòd since 1995. That means participants will be able to arrive Thursday night, Sept. 21, for dinner and an opening event at the Village. We’re still planning our day-long program for Friday, but it will certainly include presentations on Gaelic tradition, song and instrumental workshops.

Keep an eye out for more information about this year’s adjudicator, online registration, and the Fèis and Mòd program, soon. ACGA members receive an electronic newletter, An Cuairtear Ceòlmhor.